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Building and Packaging the Application

Building and packaging your Spring Boot application is an essential step in the software development life cycle. In this section, we will guide you through the process of building and packaging your application using Maven or Gradle. We will explain the build configuration, demonstrate how to execute the build process, explore the generated artifacts, and discuss common packaging options. Throughout this section, we will provide code samples to illustrate the build and packaging process in a Spring Boot application.

1. Understanding the Build Process:

The build process is responsible for compiling the source code, resolving dependencies, running tests, and packaging the application into a distributable format. Spring Boot projects typically use build tools like Maven or Gradle to automate these tasks.

2. Building with Maven:

Maven is a popular build tool widely used in the Java ecosystem. To build your Spring Boot application with Maven, follow these steps:

Step 1: Configure the Maven build settings in the `pom.xml` file. Here’s an example:

“`xml
<project>
<modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
<groupId>com.example</groupId>
<artifactId>my-spring-boot-app</artifactId>
<version>1.0.0</version>
<packaging>jar</packaging>

<!– Dependencies and other configuration –>

<!– Build configuration –>
<build>
<plugins>
<plugin>
<groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
<artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
</plugin>
</plugins>
</build>
</project>
“`

In this example, we specify the project details, including the packaging format and the Spring Boot Maven plugin.

Step 2: Execute the Maven build command. Open a terminal or command prompt, navigate to the project directory, and run the following command:

“`
mvn clean package
“`

This command cleans the previous build artifacts and packages the application into a JAR file.

3. Building with Gradle:

Gradle is another popular build tool that offers flexibility and extensibility. To build your Spring Boot application with Gradle, follow these steps:

Step 1: Configure the Gradle build settings in the `build.gradle` file. Here’s an example:

“`groovy
plugins {
id ‘org.springframework.boot’ version ‘2.5.0’
id ‘io.spring.dependency-management’ version ‘1.0.11.RELEASE’
id ‘java’
}

group = ‘com.example’
version = ‘1.0.0’
sourceCompatibility = ‘1.8’

repositories {
mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
implementation ‘org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web’
// Other dependencies
}

// Build configuration
bootJar {
mainClassName = ‘com.example.MySpringBootApplication’
}
“`

In this example, we specify the project details, dependencies, and the main class for the application.

Step 2: Execute the Gradle build command. Open a terminal or command prompt, navigate to the project directory, and run the following command:

“`
./gradlew clean build
“`

This command cleans the previous build artifacts and builds the application, generating the necessary JAR file.

4. Exploring the Generated Artifacts:

After the build process, you will find the generated artifacts in the `target` directory for Maven or the `build` directory for Gradle. The main artifact is usually a JAR file that contains your application’s compiled classes and dependencies. Additionally, the build process generates other files, such as test reports and static analysis reports, depending on your configuration.

5. Packaging Options:

Spring Boot provides various packaging options

to suit different deployment scenarios. The default packaging format is a JAR file, which includes all the necessary dependencies. However, you can also package your application as a WAR file for deployment in a servlet container.

To configure the packaging format, update the `<packaging>` element in the Maven `pom.xml` file or use the `war` plugin in Gradle. Here are the examples:

Maven:

“`xml
<packaging>war</packaging>
“`

Gradle:

“`groovy
apply plugin: ‘war’
“`

Conclusion:

Building and packaging your Spring Boot application is a critical step in the development process. In this section, we explored the build configuration, demonstrated how to execute the build process using Maven or Gradle, and discussed the generated artifacts and packaging options. By following the provided code samples and understanding the build process, you can successfully build and package your Spring Boot application for deployment. In the next section, we will explore deployment options and strategies for Spring Boot applications.

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About Author
Ozzie Feliciano CTO @ Felpfe Inc.

Ozzie Feliciano is a highly experienced technologist with a remarkable twenty-three years of expertise in the technology industry.

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